Weekly Update 4.15.19

 “Penalties against possession of a drug should not be more damaging to an individual than the use of the drug itself; and where they are, they should be changed. Nowhere is this more clear than in the laws against possession of marijuana in private for personal use... Therefore, I support legislation amending Federal law to eliminate all Federal criminal penalties for the possession of up to one ounce [28g] of marijuana.”
Jimmy Carter,
39th President of the United States

     Welcome to this week’s WeCAN Weekly Email Update, friends, and Happy 420! Why, you might ask, is there a reference to a cannabis centered holiday in the opening paragraph of this week’s Weekly Email Update? Because this week we will expand on the failings of Cannabis/Marijuana Prohibition and how Cannabis Justice warriors are fighting for those unfairly affected by prohibition.
     “420”, the cannabis-centric, worldwide holiday is celebrated each year on April 20th (you can read more about how the holiday came to be coined 420 here). To understand how we ended up in Prohibition, using cannabis as a reason to incarcerate, it is important to go back to what was happening in the United States in the early 1900’s just after the Mexican Revolution. At this time we saw an influx of immigration from Mexico into states like Texas and Louisiana. These new Americans brought with them their native language, culture, and customs; one of these customs was the use of cannabis, or “marihuana”, as a medicine and relaxant.
     While Americans were very familiar with “cannabis” because it was present in almost all tinctures and medicines available at the time, the word “marihuana” was a foreign term. So, when the media began to play on the fears that the public had about these new citizens by spreading propaganda about the “disruptive Mexicans” with their dangerous native behaviors, including marihuana use, the rest of the nation did not know that this “marihuana” was a plant they already had in their medicine cabinets. 
      During hearings on cannabis law in the 1930’s, claims were made about cannabis' ability to cause men of color to become violent and solicit sex from white women. This imagery became the backdrop for the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937 which effectively banned its use and sales.
     When the Act was ruled unconstitutional years later, it was replaced with the Controlled Substances Act in the 1970’s which established Schedules for ranking substances according to their level of danger and potential for addiction. Cannabis was placed in the most restrictive category, Schedule I, supposedly as a place holder while then-President Nixon commissioned a report to give a final recommendation.
     The Schafer Commission, as it was called, declared that cannabis should not be in Schedule I and even doubted its designation as an illicit substance. However, Nixon discounted the recommendations of the commission, and cannabis remains a Schedule I substance.
     The enforcement of cannabis laws generates some of the justice system’s starkest racial disparities. “The War on Marijuana in Black and White,” a landmark report from the ACLU, details the staggering racial bias and financial waste of our country’s counterproductive fight against a drug widely considered less harmful than alcohol. In the states with the worst disparities, Blacks were on average over six times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession than whites. In the worst offending counties across the country, Blacks were over 10, 15, even 30 times more likely to be arrested than white residents in the same county. These glaring racial disparities in cannabis arrests are not a northern or southern phenomenon, nor a rural or urban phenomenon, but rather a national one. They exist regardless of whether Blacks make up 50% or 5% of a county’s overall population. In addition to its unfairness, the war on marijuana is a colossal waste of resources: States spent over $3.61billion combined enforcing cannabis possession laws in 2010.# 
     In the paper, “The Consequences and Costs of Marijuana Prohibition”, by Katherine Beckett and Steve Herbert of the University of Washington (Seattle), Professors Beckett and Herbert find that prohibition has unequivocally failed.
Take a look at a summery of some of the findings of each paper below: (Editor's note: the following section in red was omitted from the online posting and any subsequent printouts unintentionally. The editor extends sincere apologies.)
     -Increasing cannabis related arrests does not achieve the stated goals of cannabis prohibition (to suppress the use of cannabis). Findings indicate that the intensification of law enforcement has not reduced cannabis consumption. Indeed, cannabis has become more available, affordable, and potent as the number of cannabis arrests has skyrocketed
     -The collective costs of cannabis prohibition for the public are significant; the personal costs to individuals are also substantial, not adequately assessed by policymakers, and may negatively impact society as a whole
     -Decriminalizing cannabis and de-prioritizing enforcement of cannabis laws leads to no significant increase in cannabis use
     -There have been more than 15 million cannabis arrests in the United States since 1995, including an estimated 659,700 in 2017— significantly more than for all violent crimes combined. One person is arrested for cannabis every 48 seconds. More than 90% of cannabis arrests are for possession, not manufacture or distribution +
     -Civil forfeiture laws allow police to seize the money and property of suspected cannabis offenders—charges need not even be filed. The claim is against the property, not the defendant. The owner must then prove that the property is “innocent.” Enforcement abuses stemming from forfeiture laws abound
     -Of cannabis possession arrests in the District of Columbia, a staggering 91% were of Blacks. In Mississippi, 69% of all cannabis possession arrests were of Blacks. In Georgia and Louisiana, the numbers are 64% and 61%, respectively. These figures are further illuminated when taking into account the difference between Blacks’ percentage of cannabis arrests and Blacks’ percentage of state populations. In Illinois, for instance, Blacks make up 15% of the population, but account for 58% of the cannabis possession arrests. Similarly, in Alabama, 60% of the cannabis possession arrests are of Blacks, yet Blacks account for less than 25% of the population. In Kentucky and Minnesota, Blacks represent only 8% and 5% of the respective states, but 36% and 31% of the cannabis possession arrests. Whatever costs are associated with being arrested for cannabis are thus disproportionately borne by African Americans #
     -Indeed, of the 10 states with the lowest disparities in Black-white arrest rates — Hawaii, Alaska, Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon, Maine, California, Texas, Arizona, and Rhode Island—seven are among the 15 states with the highest Latino populations, including the top four: New Mexico, California, Texas, and Arizona. In other words, in these states, a portion, if not a significant number, of cannabis possession arrests are of Latinos, but the FBI/UCR likely classifies them as “white” arrests, thereby reducing artificially the Black-white arrest disparities to the extent that Latinos are arrested at higher rates than whites. That is, if many of those “white” arrests are actually arrests of Latinos, and if the Latino arrest rate is greater than the white arrest rate, the actual Black-white arrest rates are much greater than the disparities contained in the present data. How much greater, unfortunately, cannot be ascertained from the present FBI/UCR data #
     In response to celebrating the privileged joys of cannabis on 4/20, many are beginning to mirror their celebrations with a day of action and activism on 4/21 (April 21st). The group 421ForAll (https://www.421forall.com), for example, is an entity dedicated to promoting awareness of cannabis legalization issues related to criminal justice reform, social and economic empowerment, patient rights, environmental protectionism, and inclusion/diversity/access matters.^ They will have their first event this coming Sunday, 4/21, featuring a live-streamed fundraising event at New York City’s Chelsea Music Hall at 8pm benefiting some of the organizations leading the way for cannabis equality
      For a comprehensive look into cannabis advocacy, social justice groups, and education, check out this list here, this article here, and these educational platforms here and here. We hope to see you during cannabis themed celebrations around the county this month and we hope, too, to hear about some of your cannabis advocacy on 4/21. 
     Send us a pic or a brief description of how you got involved to admin@wecantogether.net and we’ll feature you work in an upcoming Email! Happy advocating! 

* https://faculty.washington.edu/kbeckett/The%20Consequences%20and%20Costs%20of%20Marijuana%20Prohibition.pdf
+ https://www.mpp.org/issues/legalization/marijuana-prohibition-facts/
^ https://www.421forall.com
# https://www.aclu.org/report/report-war-marijuana-black-and-white

 

HAPPENING TODAY, SUNDAY, APRIL 14th, 2019

Cannabis Week at Next Stage
hosted by Next Stage Arts Project
Sunday, April 14th, 2019-Saturday, April 20th, 2019 at Next Stage Arts Project (15 Kimball Hill, Putney, VT, 05346). Times Vary. You can find each event listed individually throughout this week’s Weekly Email Update.
On July 1st, 2018 Vermont legalized adult personal possession of one ounce of cannabis (marijuana) and allows individuals to cultivate two mature plants and four immature plants per household. Whether you are a recreational user, want to learn to grow, or are interested solely in the health benefits of CBD-based hemp products (also from cannabis), Next Stage offers a week of events that focus on cannabis for you to explore. 


Today's Events:
9am–12pm: GROWERS WORKSHOP: Learn to grow indoors or outdoors. 
Tickets: $35
With Pete McMahon, owner of Liquid Sun and Brian Berry, entrepreneur


12pm–5pm: MARKETPLACE
Products, food vendors and festive music—FREE
12pm–3pm: FOOD!
Dosa Kitchen will be serving dosas; Healing From Foods will be serving vegan nachos, tomato soup and grilled cheese sandwiches.


2pm–4pm: PANEL DISCUSSION
sponsored by Northeast Processing. Admission by donation. Online registration is highly recommended.
The Science of Cannabis & CBD – Panelists include moderator David Hull of Vermont Pre-Rolls, Scott Keeler of Origin Therapeutics, Carl Christianson of Northeast Processing, Deane Wilson of Southern Vermont Wellness, and Senator Becca Balint. 

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Common Ground for Climate Action
sponsored by Vermont Healthy Soils Coalition, Living Earth Action Group, and Edible Brattleboro
Sunday, April 14th, 2019, at Neighbors’ Hall at Solar Hill (229 Western Ave, Brattleboro, VT, 05301). 2pm-5pm. Neighbors' Hall is at the back of the building on the top of the hill above the parking area. Suggested donation $10, no one turned away. All are welcome. Please bring snacks to share (if you like). Registration is not required but please do RSVP to let us know you're coming so we can be sure the space will accommodate us all well. RSVP by email to info@vermonthealthysoilscoalition.org. For more information Contact Cat Buxton 802-359-3330.
Join us in Brattleboro to advance the soil conversation and learn how to connect to actions for building the soil sponge and deepening resilience in your community. Soil is the glue that holds our landscape and our communities together. The soil carbon sponge is a critical component of adapting to our changing climate and mitigating the effects of flooding and drought. Join members of the Vermont Healthy Soils Coalition to hear about the overlooked superhero for climate correction: The ground beneath our feet!
Presenters include author, educator and organic consultant Grace Gershuny of Barnet, compost and soil health educator Cat Buxton of Sharon, and agroecologist and tree steward Tatiana Schreiber, Ph.D. of Westminster West.

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HAPPENING THIS WEEK, MONDAY, APRIL 15th, 2019-SUNDAY, APRIL 21st, 2019

 

Cannabis Week at Next Stage: Cooking With Cannabis (CBD), With Chef Sarah Dal Balcon (Owner of Healing with Food)
hosted by Next Stage Arts Project
Monday, April 15th, 2019 at Next Stage Arts Project (15 Kimball Hill, Putney, VT, 05346). 6pm-9pm. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased here; Class size is limited to 12 people. 
Sarah, from California, was a personal chef for VIP and celebrity families and a menu consultant for restaurants. In this class, Sarah will show you how to infuse olive oil, hemp seed oil, cream, and butter with CBD (which uses buds from the hemp plant). The class will then participate in making a delicious meal using these infused staples. While the class will work with CBD, the techniques are no different if you chose to make THC infused staples at home with buds from the marijuana plant.
MENU:
Salad:
Mixed green salad tossed with CBD infused hemp oil dressing
Main Course: Pasta with Pesto made with CBD infused olive oil
Dessert: Fried bananas in Caramel sauce made with CBD infused butter and cream
Beverages: Wine will be served

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My Body, My Country
Thursday, April 18th, 2019 at Landmark College (19 River Road South, Putney, VT, 05346) in the East Academic Building Auditorium. 7pm-8pm. This event will be located in the East Academic Building in the auditorium (marked EAB-Auditorium). For directions and a map of the Landmark College campus, please visit: https://www.landmark.edu/about/directions-to-campus.
In every era, there are some bodies that are more policed or “owned” than others. This is what perhaps makes defining our internal and external geographies so challenging. We often undertake an exploratory journey attempting to separate our identity and sense of becoming from social, cultural, and other pressures. Often, these explorations shift throughout our lives. We ultimately are our own countries, and we carry our geography within us.  
What are the lines of distinction in terms of who has the freedom or choice of their body? How do we begin to explore the self as topography?  My Body, My Country introduces the following artists who will be exploring these topics in a live performance of their written work. This is a National Poetry Month event sponsored and hosted by Landmark College's Education Department, Student Affairs, and Centers for Diversity and Inclusion.
ABOUT THE ARTISTS 
-U-Meleni Mhlaba-Adebo is a Leominister, MA born Zimbabwean American grown poet, author, actress, singer and educator who has performed nationally and internationally in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Nigeria, Portugal and Ireland. She was featured on “WGBH Suitcase Stories.” Her poetry collection “Soul Psalms” (She Writes Press) was described by David Updike as “written in a fearless female voice tempered with optimism and healing possibilities of love.”
-Shanta Lee Gander is an artist and multi-faceted professional. As an artist, her endeavors include writing prose, poetry, investigative journalism, and photography. Her poetry, prose, and personal essays have been featured in Rebelle Society, on the Ms. Magazine Blog, The Commons weekly newspaper. Shanta Lee is the co-author of ‘Ghosts of Cuba: An Interracial Couple’s Exploration of Cuba in the Age of Trump—Told in Images & Words’ (Green Writers Press, September 2019).
-Desmond Peeples' fiction, poetry, and nonfiction have appeared in Five [Quarterly], Big Bridge, Goreyesque, Hunger Mountain, and elsewhere, and their original music is released independently. They were the founding editor of the literary arts magazine, Mount Island, and currently consult for Green Writers Press.

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Cannabis Week at Next Stage presents The Legend of 4/20 (2017)
hosted by Next Stage Arts Project, part of the [FRAMED] Hosted Movie Series
Thursday, April 18th, 2019 at Next Stage Arts Project (15 Kimball Hill, Putney, VT, 05346). 7pm. $5 suggested donation at the door.
This documentary explores the growing trend of marijuana decriminalization in the U.S. and the use of cannabis in medicine, art, fine dining, and more.

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Protest Vigil at TD Bank
sponsored by Post Oil Solutions
Friday, April 19th, 2019 (and every Friday) at TD Bank Brattleboro (215 Main Street, Brattleboro, VT). In front of the building. 12pm-1pm. Signs will be provided
TD is a major investor in Tar Sands. TD helps to fund the Dakota Access Pipeline. What You Can Do (besides attending the vigils): If you’re a TD depositor, change banks! Founded in 2005, Post Oil Solutions is a 501c3 community organizing project in Southeastern Vermont whose mission is to help empower the people of the Central Connecticut River Valley bioregion in this era of global warming and climate change to develop sustainable, resilient , collaborative, and socially just communities leading to a self- and community-sufficient post petroleum society.

 

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A Visit to Unconventional Polyface Farm
presented by Living Earth Action Group
Friday, April 19th, 2019 at Westminster West Congregational Church (3470 US-5, Westminster, VT 05158). 5pm. Please bring snacks if you can. All are welcome. For more information and to receive the weekly Living Earth News, contact Caitlin Adair pcadair@sover.net 802-387-5779.
Nicole Crouch Diaz will tell us about her visit last summer to Joel Salatin’s Polyface Farm in Virginia. Nicole is a passionate Earth-loving farmer/gardener and has studied and practiced many ‘new’ techniques in her garden in Westminster West, where she lives and co-gardens with her mother. Salatin's 550-acre farm, featured prominently in Michael Pollan's book The Omnivore's Dilemma (2006) and the documentary films, Food, Inc. and Fresh, and his unconventional farming practices have drawn attention from the alternative agriculture community, especially those interested in sustainable livestock management. Pollan became interested in Salatin because of his refusal to send food to locations not within a four-hour drive of his farm, i.e. outside his local “foodshed.” At this meeting we will learn about Salatin’s garden, his farming practices, and how they relate to food justice in our area. 

 

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Cannabis Week at Next Stage presents Bread and Puppet Theatre: Diagonal Man: Theory and Praxis
hosted by Next Stage Arts Project
Saturday, April 20th, 2019 (4/20!) at Next Stage Arts Project (15 Kimball Hill, Putney, VT, 05346). 7:30pm. Tickets $15.00 (no one turned away for lack of funds)
The politically radical puppet theater presents their new play, Diagonal Man: Theory and Praxis. Bread and Puppet Theater has been active since the 1960s, is based in Glover, Vermont, founded and directed by Peter Schumann. Returning to Next Stage by rousing popular demand.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

 

Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up 
Monday April 22nd, 2019 at KidsPLAYce (20 Elliot St., Brattleboro, VT, 05301). 5:30pm-7:30pm. A vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 10 and under will be provided. RSVP helpful, but not required. Contact Abby Mnookin for more info at abby@350vt.org.
Mother Up!: Families Rise Up for Climate Action is a project of 350Vermont that brings together families to talk about the tough realities of climate change and to participate in the transition to a healthier and safer world. We'll talk about how racial justice and climate justice are interconnected. We'll also reflect on 350VT's Next Steps: A Climate Solutions Walk and hear stories from local walkers.

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Climate Change Café presents
The House is on Fire: A Film and Community Conversation About Climate Crisis
a project of Post Oil Solutions
Tuesday, April 23rd, 2019 at Brooks Memorial Library (224 Main Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05031). 6pm-8pm. Free. Light Refreshments Available. For more information please email bereal@vermontel.net.
We will begin with a screening of the excellent film, “The Wisdom to Survive: Climate Change, Capitalism & Community,” which has been described by Union Theological Seminary Professor, Tom F. Driver, as “a starkly prophetic film (that) combines the direst of warnings with deep love for life. It makes clear that our profit-oriented growth economy has caused the climate catastrophe and cannot itself rescue us from disaster. We need new thinking and a new way of life.”
In the face of the growing potential for social collapse and even human extinction, how are we responding? What is our gut-level reaction to this unfolding existential crisis? Do we believe that we have the wisdom to survive?
Following the film, we will then move into a facilitated conversation about the climate crisis. This is offered as an opportunity for us to come out of our heads and share with others what is in our hearts. Connecting with each other in this way is the first, necessary step to moving beyond denial  and  disempowerment, and becoming the proactive agency that our situation calls for.
For interested parties, there is also the possibility of starting an ongoing group, that would continue to engage with each other, to share, explore, and, most of all, support one another as we come to accept and deal with this unprecedented catastrophe.

 

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Bernie 2020 Organizing Kickoff
Saturday, April 27th, 2019 at 118 Gallery (118 Elliot Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05301). 4pm-6pm.
Snacks and beverages will be available; you are invited, but not required, to bring something to share. Please RSVP here: https://act.berniesanders.com/event/Organizing_Kickoff_Main_Attend/4592
. For those willing to help provide childcare/activities please contact Ann Z. : annbz@comcast.net. 
Come one, come all: join your friends and neighbors on Saturday, April 27th at 2 pm at 118 Elliot Street as we take part in the Bernie campaign's 2020 Global Organizing Kickoff Event. We will be one of thousands of events taking place that day around the country as we continue to build our giant grassroots movement. Come find out how we can begin to plug in locally, as the campaign unveils its organizing strategy to win the nomination for Bernie and the Political Revolution. 
If you worked on Bernie's 2016 campaign, great. Come meet old and new friends. If you are new to the idea of volunteering on a presidential campaign and just want to see what it’s all about, we want you, too!
Hopefully we will have a volunteer to supervise kids' activities in the small side room, so this can be a more family-friendly event--the Political Revolution is for everyone! 

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Diversity Celebration 2019: Voices of the People
sponsored by the Windham Southeast Supervisory Union Diversity and Equity Committee, WSESU Schools and the Town of Brattleboro
Friday, May 3rd, 2019 at 118 Elliot Gallery (118 Elliot Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05301) and at the intersection of Main Street and Elliot Street. 5pm-8pm.
The theme of the celebration is Voices of the People, highlighting perspectives and experiences of historically marginalized peoples. This year’s event will include a block party at the Main Street end of Elliot Street from 5-8pm with food vendors, performances, and tables with community organizations, and children's activities and show of student work on our theme, as well as other Voices of the People-themed art works, at 118 Elliot Gallery.
We are asking for individuals, groups, and business to be involved in the celebration. You can be involved by volunteering for activities (groups and Individuals are encouraged to offer a kid friendly activity based on our theme. This could include interactive games, demonstrations, crafts, face painting, art or other creative ideas to get people thinking and doing) or tabling (Tell people about the work you do and offer a kid friendly activity or interactive display). If your group would like to participate in any way, please fill out this google form and someone from the Diversity and Equity Committee will be in touch. Thank you for helping us carry on and grow this annual celebration!

 

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Coffee with Coffey
Monday, May 6th, 2019 at the Guilford Country Store (475 Calvin Coolidge Memorial Highway, Guilford, VT). 5:30pm-6:30pm.
This spring, State Representative Sara Coffey will continue to host “Coffee with Coffey” hours. We have had great attendance and great discussions among neighbors. Please come at the time that works for you:
Mondays in Guilford: April 1st and May 6th at 5:30 at the Guilford Country Store
Saturdays in Vernon, April 6th and May 4th at 9:30 at the Vernon Free Library.
It’s been nice to have some Vernon folks join on Mondays in Guilford, and Guilford folks joining us on Saturdays at the Library in Vernon. If you can’t come feel free to be in touch via email: SCoffey@leg.state.vt.us


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Camp for a Common Cause
Friday, May 17th, 2019-Saturday, May 18th, 2019 on the Brattleboro Common (intersection of Park Place, Route 5 and Route 30 in Brattleboro, VT, 05301). Pitch tents starting at 5pm Friday; we must vacate by 10am Saturday after a light breakfast. No alcohol and no fires please. Dogs are welcome, but must remain on a leash at all times. Contact Julianne with questions or to make a reservation: 802.490.2951, email jmills@GroundworksVT.org, or go to GroundworksVT.org. 
Join us for this year’s overnight campout where we will raise awareness about homelessness in our community and raise funds to support Groundworks' efforts to house our neighbors experiencing homelessness.
The fun starts on Friday with live music and a community barbecue! Unable to camp overnight?  No problem! Join us for food and music! You can support Groundworks with a donation, and/or purchase a tent for a neighbor in need.
Fundraising: Teams and individuals are asked to fundraise a suggested minimum of $100 per person to support Groundworks.  PLEASE NOTE - all contributions are welcome and it costs nothing to camp.  We ask participants to try to raise some money on our behalf.  All contributions are tax deductible.
Register Online at https://groundworks.rallybound.org/Camp2018 and ask your friends, neighbors, co-workers, and family for contributions to support your campout.

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Rootskills Spring Workshop
Saturday, May 18th, 2019 at the School for International Training (SIT 1 Kipling Rd, Brattleboro, VT 05301). 8am-6:30pm. Find out more about schedule, registration, scholarships etc on our website: https://grassrootsfund.org/tools/2019-workshops
The Grassroots Fund's RootSkills workshops are day-long gatherings where grassroots organizers, colleagues and supporters convene to network, share stories and dig into both issue- and process-based skills-building sessions. We work with a planning committee ahead of each event to ensure a broad range of lived experiences and perspectives weigh in as we set agendas, select workshop topics and invite speakers. 
This event's theme will focus on racial and economic disparities as we discuss in/equity in rural, New England communities.

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Pride Family Picnic
hosted by Green Mountain Crossroads
Sunday, June 2nd, 2019 at Living Memorial Park (61 Guilford Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05301) at the Kiwani’s Pavilion at the top of the hill. 11am-2pm.
The much anticipated PRIDE FAMILY PICNIC hosted by Green Mountain Crossroads is back! One of the only events each year in southern Vermont where LGBTQ parents and kids (of all ages!) come together and get to celebrate the community, visibility, knowledge, and power of LGBTQIA+ people with their families. Bring a dish to share! GMC will provide watermelon, drinks (kid-friendly), hot dogs (meat, turkey, and tofu), buns, and condiments. Find us all the way at the top of Living Memorial Park!  

 

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RESOURCE FOR WeCAN: Rapid Response Text Alert System
When WeCAN began Song & Solidarity set up a Rapid Response Text Alert System for WeCAN Groups. Directions for signing up are on WeCAN's website, here: https://www.wecantogether.net/rapid_response We were reminded of the Rapid Response text alerts system as President Trump moves towards firing Mueller. In the event Mueller is fired, MoveOn is planning a nation-wide simultaneous protest. The trick will be to get the word out fast if/when the time comes. We are grateful to Song and Solidarity for providing this service.

 

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STANDING REGULAR MEETINGS 

 

Brattleboro State Representatives’ Updates and Community Conversation
First Saturday of the Month, alternating between 10am and 4pm (2.2.19 was at 10am). Location information to follow. Childcare available upon request by contacting EmilieKornheiser@gmail.com.
As promised, all three of your Brattleboro State Representatives, Mollie Burke, Emilie Kornheiser, and Tristan Toleno, will gather in Brattleboro to host a community conversation and share updates from the first few weeks of the legislative session. Our series of monthly conversations— scheduled for the first Saturday of the month— will alternate between 10am and 4pm. 

 

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Women Veterans Weekly Coffee and Tea Social
Thursday Mornings at Brattleboro Legion Post 5 Inc. (32 Linden Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05301). 9am-10am.
All female veterans are invited to join in the Women Veterans group coffee held at the American Legion.  All women veterans are welcome. You do not need to be a Legion member.

 

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Lost River Racial Justice, Black Lives Matter-South, and People Of Color Caucus Regular Meeting
Reoccurring racial justice organizing meetings every 2nd Monday at The Root Social Justice Center (The Whetstone Studio of the Arts, 28 Williams Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05301) on the First Floor. 6pm-8pm. Childcare provided. Fragrance & nut free space.  

 

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Youth 4 Change

Meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month from 5:30pm-8pm. 
For more information please contact Youth 4 Change at youth4changeaction@gmail.com.
Agenda:
5:30pm: Drop in homework time and art making
6:00pm: Food
6:30pm: Meeting and Organizing
Youth 4 Change is for local-area youth 12-22 interested in political organizing around local/state/national social justice issues that are important to them. Brattleboro area advocates and educators are holding a space, and assisting youth in building a strong personal tool kit to organize for change.  Using a variety of creative methods, we aim to enable youth with tools for resilience, courage and compassion, while fostering their ability to speak up about issues that matter to them, and to take action in the name of love and liberation for all people.  Come explore issues of racial, economic and gender justice through art, movement, first-hand accounts and contemplative practices. Connect with area youth around the issues that matter to you and strengthen your tool kit for action! 

 

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Windham County NAACP Regular Meetings
Monthly community meetings are held on the third Thursday of every month at The Root Center for Social Justice (The Whetstone Studio for the Arts, 28 Williams Street, Brattleboro, VT, 05301) on the First Floor from 6pm-7pm. Upcoming Meetings: 3/21/19; 4/18/19; 5/16/19. For more information please email info@windhamnaacp.org. All are welcome.
The meetings are open to anyone interested in racial justice. The Mission of the NAACP is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.

 

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ONGOING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING 

Indigo Radio
Sundays at 12pm on Brattleboro Community Radio 107.7FMTo stream live: Visit www.wvew.org 
Indigo Radio, deepening understanding and making connections! IndigoRadio is a group of area educators seeking to learn through engaging with others in our community and throughout the world. We will be talking about educational and social issues both globally and locally and connecting them to our lives and Brattleboro community. Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/indigoradiowvew/. For archive recordings of past shows: https://soundcloud.com/user-654648353.

 

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